Posts Tagged ‘nasa’

Fuels for life found on moon of Saturn – an annotated infographic

April 18, 2017

Nasa’s Cassini spacecraft has discovered hydrogen and carbon dioxide erupting in plumes of vapour from Saturn’s moon Enceladus. These are the critical organic chemical ingredients that sustain microbial life in extreme environments on Earth.

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saturns-moon-signs-of-life

#Nasa probes Jupiter with Juno spacecraft in July – an annotated infographic

June 22, 2016

Nasa’s Juno spacecraft is bound for a Fourth of July encounter with the planet Jupiter, in the latest quest to study how the largest planet in the solar system formed and evolved.

The billion-dollar solar-powered probe, launched from Earth nearly five years ago, will spend 20 months in polar orbit around the gas giant.

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Juno what I mean?

Juno what I mean?

Astronaut vs sailor – who’s better connected? – an annotated infographic

May 20, 2016

 

A nice Friday afternoon infographic supplied by our friends at Media works and Global Navigation Solutions, illustrating the connectivity woes of sailors at sea. All you land-lovers should feel thankful you are never far from a reliable WiFi signal, some people aren’t so lucky.

Using findings from the 2015 Crew Connectivity Survey and information from NASA and The Atlantic, the piece details just how well connected sailors are – the answer being a resounding ‘not very’.

Sea Life vs. Space Life FULL (2) (3)

Good news if #TheMartian gets thirsty – Nasa discovers water flowing on Mars – an annotated infographic

October 1, 2015

Intriguing images from Nasa’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) suggest that water may still run across the surface of Mars from time to time.

MRO instruments have detected hydrated perchlorate salts, with water molecules bound to the crystal structure of salt. Microbes on Earth use perchlorates as an energy source.

OK, it’s hardly the Martian Evian bottling plant, but it’s intriguing news nonetheless. We here at E&T Towers eagerly await the discovery over the next crater of the Martian Log Flume and Super Happy Fun Water Slides.

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Is it wet out?

Is it wet out?

#NewHorizons probe pings back first pics of Pluto – an annotated infographic

July 8, 2015

After nine years and a journey of 5 billion kilometres, NASA’s New Horizons probe is to become the first spacecraft to visit the icy dwarf planet Pluto.

The piano-sized craft will also study the Kuiper Belt, the mysterious zone believed to contain materials formed at the birth of the solar system.

E&T news has previously reported on New Horizons’ computer glitches and Nasa’s tweaks to guide the craft on its Pluto approach.

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New Horizons approaches Pluto

New Horizons approaches Pluto

 

#ISS supply ship options as #Nasa extends use of private contractors – an annotated infographic

July 6, 2015

We’ve all been there. The delivery man says he’s going to call on a given day at a given time, so you sit waiting at home. He never shows up and now you’ve got no stuff and you’ve lost a day of your life.

Such is life on board the International Space Station (ISS) of late, with our brave space dudes awaiting a delivery of fresh supplies, only to hear that the spacecraft carrying it all exploded shortly after launch. Yodel might be one of the most unreliable courier firms on Earth, but as far as we know its lorries don’t burst in to flames, torching all your stuff. At least you’ll get it, eventually.

The positive news (sort of) for the good burghers of the ISS is that Nasa is branching out in its use of private launch contractors. A Russian Progress 60P resupply ship has been drafted in as a replacement service following the catastrophic loss of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon cargo ship. This was NASA’s third private launch failure in eight months.

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Supply and demand

Supply and demand

Nasa celebrates #Hubble25 as space telescope hits quarter-century mark – an annotated infographic

April 29, 2015

Nasa has been celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope this week.

For a quarter of a century, Hubble has peered deep into distant galaxies, revealing images of breathtaking beauty and rewriting our understanding of the cosmos. Scientists hope that Hubble will keep working for at least another five years.

E&T magazine considers next-generation space telescopes in our latest issue online, as we look at the technology behind the James Webb Space Telescope.

Hubble: no trouble

Hubble: no trouble

#Nasa probe reaches dwarf planet #Ceres – an annotated infographic

March 3, 2015

Nasa’s Dawn spacecraft is to begin orbiting Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Having been launched in 2007, Dawn spent a year from 2011-2012 orbiting Vesta – the asteroid belt’s second-biggest object – as part of a mission to understand how planets were formed. Now she’s moving on to Ceres.

Scientists have been speculating that bright lights spotted recently on Ceres’ surface could be light reflections from ice or evidence of volcanic activity.

Either that, or the good burghers of Ceres City are preparing a spectacular welcome party for Dawn’s fly-by, with an elaborate carnival, a fireworks display and possibly a laser light show. Not many people drop by Ceres, so we can only surmise that they’re pretty darn excited to see someone, even if it is only Probey Dawn enjoying one last huzzah before her mission ends in July.

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Dawn, but not forgotten

Dawn, but not forgotten

#Beagle2 wreckage found on Mars 12 years after disappearance – an annotated infographic

January 14, 2015

Nasa scientists may have discovered the wreckage of the UK’s pioneering Mars lander Beagle 2 on the surface of Mars in a breakthrough development more than 12 years after the spacecraft’s disappearance.

The fate of Beagle 2 has been a mystery ever since the closely watched failed landing attempt on Christmas Day 2003.

In a rather secretive manner, the UK Space Agency said it would release new information about the lander, a brainchild of the late British planetary scientist Professor Colin Pillinger, later this week.

It’s just a shame Professor Pillinger died in May 2014. Having endured years of jokes about his Beagle lander crash-landing and going AWOL on the surface of Mars, we’re sure he’d have been delighted to hear that the wreckage has finally been located.

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Beagle 2 Mars lander: wreckage found

Beagle 2 Mars lander: wreckage found

#Nasa readies Orion spacecraft for its first unmanned test flight – an annotated infographic

December 3, 2014

Nasa is preparing to launch its next-generation Orion spacecraft on an unmanned test flight. The capsule is designed to carry astronauts deeper into space than ever before, to an asteroid or even to Mars.

E&T has covered Orion’s journey so far, from testing the capsule parachutes for a Martian landing to the day when Nasa engineers rolled the Orion capsule out of its processing hangar at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, having finished its assembly.

E&T also has reams of space-related information gathered together on our dynamically updated Space news page, so you may wish to bookmark that page if space is your thing.

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Orion: belt up

Orion: belt up